The Advanced Photon Source
a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science User Facility

Shark Sightings!

From News-Medical.net:

APS study on shark vertebrae may help develop better treatments for bone diseases in humans

The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory has facilitated tens of thousands of experiments across nearly every conceivable area of scientific research since it first saw light more than two decades ago.

But it wasn't until earlier this year that the storied facility was used to study shark vertebrae in an experiment that one Northwestern University researcher hopes will shed light on the functionality of human bone and cartilage.

Shark spines constantly flex when they swim, said Stuart R. Stock, a materials scientist and faculty member of Northwestern's Feinberg School of Medicine. Yet they remain surprisingly resilient throughout the fish's lifetime, he said.

Human bones, however, cannot endure the same kind of bending and become more fragile as people age.

Read the entire article here.

From Technology.org:

Research on shark vertebrae could improve treatment of bone disease in humans

Argonne National Laboratory’s storied Advanced Photon Source, home to thousands of experiments through the years, is currently aiding in a study of shark spines — one that could shed light on human bones.

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory has facilitated tens of thousands of experiments across nearly every conceivable area of scientific research since it first saw light more than two decades ago.

But it wasn’t until earlier this year that the storied facility was used to study shark vertebrae in an experiment that one Northwestern University researcher hopes will shed light on the functionality of human bone and cartilage.

Read the entire article here.

Published Date
Last Updated
07.30.2019