APS User News
Issue 74, October 27, 2011

CONTENTS

DIRECTOR'S CORNER

USER MATTERS
-- Current APS and Synchrotron-related Job Openings
-- Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about ESAFs (well, almost!)
-- What Kind of User Are You?
-- Argonne to Host “Fundamental Physics of Ferroelectrics and Related Materials 2012,” January 29-February 1, 2012
-- Safety Snippets: Learning Real Lessons from Close Calls

BRIEFLY NOTED
-- Cell Phone Coverage at Argonne Getting an Upgrade
-- Weekend Deliveries Accepted at the Argonne Guest House
-- ORNL Neutron Scattering User Meeting, November 14-15, 2011
-- International Workshop on Uranium Biogeochemistry: Transformations and Applications, March 11-16, 2012
-- Upcoming General User Proposal Deadlines
-- Save the Date: APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 7-9, 2012
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DIRECTOR’S CORNER
It's the beginning of a new fiscal year, and time to take stock of the progress we've made over the last year. One area that is very impressive to me is how the user program at APS continues to grow. We've added new beamlines at sectors 12 and 34, and are up to 64 total. Our total number of badged, remote, and mail-in users and co-proposers in FY2011 reached 4713, up 7 percent from the previous year. The trend I find most interesting is how fast the number of experiments is growing. This statistic is plotted versus year in the figure here. It has exceeded 4400, 11% higher than last year, and shows no sign of saturating; indeed, the number of experiments has been accelerating in recent years, even as the number of beamtime hours remains constant and the number of beamlines grows more slowly. This shows that we are becoming more efficient in completing experiments with less beamtime. Our accelerating growth is particularly encouraging since we are just heading into the APS Upgrade project, which will provide further major increases to our capabilities and capacity for experiments over the next six years. We can feel confident that the APS has a strong future as the nation's largest user facility and foremost source of hard x-rays for science and industry.

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Current APS and Synchrotron-related Job Openings
You can view listings of current employment opportunities (including postdoctoral positions) at the APS, as well as with Collaborative Access Teams and APS Partner Institutions, on the APS web site! Jobs available at the APS are organized by division (X-ray Science Division, Accelerator Systems Division, and the APS Engineering Support Division); positions with other synchrotron-related organizations are listed chronologically as received.
  
Full job descriptions and position requirements (skills and experience level needed) are provided, together with information about how to apply.
  
You can reach these listings by going directly to http://www.aps.anl.gov/jobs/ or from the APS Home page (www.aps.anl.gov) by clicking on “Job Openings” in the left-hand navigation column.

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Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about ESAFs (well, almost!)
This is part one of a two-part article all about ESAFs. The APS Experiment Safety Approval Form (ESAF) is made available to users from around the world through the web-based ESAF system. Safety forms are submitted and reviewed continuously throughout the year. In fact, almost 4,400 ESAFs were approved last year!

Here are some basic facts all potential experimenters should know about the ESAF process, submission system, and requirements.

  • The ESAF is used as the safety review method for all experimental work at the APS (including experiments that do not use the storage ring x-rays).
  • ESAFs should be submitted at least seven days prior to the experiment start date to allow enough time for the safety review and thus avoid delays in beginning the work.
  • Access to any given ESAF is limited to users that are listed on the ESAF, beamline staff of the beamline where the experiment will take place, and APS safety reviewers. Access is granted by APS badge number.
  • The ESAF system is used to gather information on the potential hazards involved in the experiment and to provide a method of identifying controls to mitigate the hazards.
  • Experiments that involve certain hazards such as radioactive materials, biohazards, high-pressure systems new to the APS (excluding diamond anvil cells or equipment that is part of the beamline), lasers that are new to the APS, or other unusual hazards require more time for review and approval. Reviews for experiments requiring biosafety level 2 or 3 controls can require up to six to eight weeks!
  • The ESAF system uses a graded approach. Users are required to complete information under the “General,” “Experimenters,” “Description,” “Materials,” and “Equipment” tabs in the on-line form. Based on hazards reported under these tabs, additional tabs may become visible requesting further information.
  • Files can be attached to an ESAF (on the “Description” tab) to help explain the planned experiment (e.g., standard operating procedures for a particular piece of equipment or for handling hazardous materials).
  • The “Requirements” tab cannot be modified by a user. It displays a summary of the requirements for mitigating the hazards indicated in the ESAF. It is generated automatically based on information provided on the “Materials” and “Equipment” pages.
  • Electrical equipment brought to the APS must undergo a safety inspection. If a user indicates on the “Equipment” tab that they will be bringing electrical equipment, the “Electrical Inspection” tab will automatically become visible. Complete this tab to request the inspection.
  • ESAFs require two approvals: both the host beamline and the APS must approve the ESAF before work can begin. ESAFs can be edited by a user who is listed on the "Experimenters" tab only up until both the beamline and APS approvals are given.
  • The system generates a report that contains the Experiment Hazard Control Plan (posted on the x-ray station door) and an Experiment Authorization Form (EA). The EA form must be signed by the on-site spokesperson (OS) for the experiment and a member of the beamline staff. (For experiments involving only Remote or Mail-in users, the system provides for an electronic signature by the OS.) When a user is ready to begin his or her experiment, he or she must call the on-duty Floor Coordinator. The signed EA form is then given to the Floor Coordinator for posting in the beamline end cabinet. Then the experiment may begin!

In the next issue: Helpful tips and tricks for completing an ESAF: What helps make a successful ESAF, and what are the common shortcomings with tips on how to avoid them. For any questions about the ESAF system or experiment safety at the APS please contact Bruce Glagola (glagola@aps.anl.gov) or Nena Moonier (nmoonier@aps.anl.gov).

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What Kind of User Are You?
Did you know there are four different kinds of users working at the APS? Each type has its own profile—see the table below to learn more. All core training courses are available both on–site and off-site through the web. See http://www.aps.anl.gov/Safety_and_Training/Training/ for full information about safety training.

User Type

Description

Needs a User Agreement?

Needs an
APS User Badge Number?

Training
Requirements

On-site

A user that is present at the APS for the experiment.

YES

YES

Must complete APS Core Training requirements

Remote

A user that is not present at the APS for the experiment but manipulates the beamline remotely.

YES

YES

Must complete ESH 223U Cyber Security

Mail-in

A user that is not present at the APS and mails in samples for beamline staff to run.

YES

YES

None

Off-site

A user that is not present at the APS but is a collaborator or research participant for the experiment.

NO

NO

None

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Argonne to Host “Fundamental Physics of Ferroelectrics and Related Materials 2012,” January 29-February 1, 2012
The workshop “Fundamental Physics of Ferroelectrics and Related Materials 2012” will be hosted at Argonne National Laboratory from January 29-February 1, 2012. This workshop, held annually since 1990, focuses on the interplay of structural, electronic, and magnetic degrees of freedom in these materials, which give rise to competing instabilities with respect to atomic displacements, lattice strains, magnetization, and/or polarization. These effects lead to rich phase diagrams and unusual physical properties arising from their high sensitivity to external fields. Many new materials have been discovered as a result, including novel, tunable dielectrics; piezoelectrics; and multiferroics. Tremendous advances in experimental techniques in the synthesis of artificially structured atomic scale materials will spur the discovery of many more of these materials.

The 2012 meeting will bring together computational materials theorists, condensed matter theorists, and experimentalists to discuss the current understanding of these “active” materials. Presentations will include oral and invited talks chosen from the submitted abstracts and a poster session. Topics include the following:

  • New ferroelectric materials
  • Multiferroics
  • Piezo electrics and electro-mechanical response
  • Multifunctional materials
  • Morphotropic phase boundary systems
  • Relaxor ferroelectrics
  • Ferroelectric films and superlattices
  • Interface effects
  • Nanostructured ferroelectrics
  • Domain effects
  • Dynamics and glassy behavior
  • New methods for synthesis, characterization, and theory

Abstracts are now being accepted on the conference web site at http://www.msd.anl.gov/science/fpf. The deadline for submission is December 2, 2011. Registration deadlines and other important information are also available on the web.

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Safety Snippets: Learning Real Lessons from Close Calls
A “close call” or accident without injury is easy to shrug off and forget. But, there is a danger in brushing off accidents that don’t hurt, harm, or damage. When a “close call” happens, it should immediately send up a red warning flag that something was wrong, unplanned, unexpected, and could possibly happen again. The next time it happens, it could result in serious damage, injury, or death.

For every accident there are usually several contributing factors, most of which can be controlled. The best way to prevent the reoccurrence of an accident is by looking at those “close calls.” By looking into the causes of an accident, steps can be taken to eliminate the hazard and improve the work system.

Sometimes there are multiple causes for an accident. These causes could involve equipment (unguarded machinery), environment (poor lighting or noise level), people (procedures not understood or not followed), or management (allowed shortcuts). Don’t rush to judge. Examine the facts and find what’s missing. Look for immediate and underlying causes. An immediate cause may be an unsafe condition like a mechanical failure or it could be an unsafe action by an experimenter. The underlying cause could be poor machine maintenance, a missing guard, a crowded work area, or a lack of training.

All serious incidents should be reported to 911 and your supervisor or sector point of contact. Minor incidents can be reported to 811 and your supervisor or sector point of contact so that accident/injury report forms can be completed. Once an investigation is completed, solutions should be sought to prevent the accident from occurring again. Solutions may involve engineering controls, administrative controls, additional training, or increased communication between management and workers.

Experimenters should daily inspect the work area for unsafe conditions and/or unsafe actions. If found, report them to the supervisor or sector point of contact. Hazard awareness is key to preventing accidents before they happen. Take steps to eliminate hazards as soon as they are discovered. Learn the real lessons from close calls. They can happen again and again until they cause injury, so tell your supervisor about every accident, no matter how minor it may seem at the time. You never know when an incident may be repeated and result in an injury or even death.

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BRIEFLY NOTED

-- Cell Phone Coverage at Argonne Getting an Upgrade
Argonne National Laboratory is in the process of upgrading its cell phone coverage to include all carriers. The modifications to the Lab’s infrastructure are almost complete. The Lab is currently waiting for the various wireless carriers to supply the necessary hardware for these upgrades. At this time, there is Lab-wide coverage for NEXTEL.  The APS and CNM buildings also have coverage for Sprint. Commitments have been received from Sprint, AT&T, and Verizon; the Lab is in process of finalizing contracts with AT&T and Sprint. Commitments from US Cellular and T-Mobile are not yet finalized.

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-- Weekend Deliveries Accepted at the Argonne Guest House
Non-hazardous Fed-Ex shipments for both APS users and staff can be delivered on weekends to the Argonne Guest House. Shipments must have the recipient's name and an APS location specified. Recipients are expected to contact the Guest House to follow up on the shipment delivery and arrange to pick it up. You can contact the Argonne Guest House at 630-739-6000 or 800-632-8990. Please contact Susan Strasser (APS User Office) with any questions: 630-252-5981 or strasser@aps.anl.gov.

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-- ORNL Neutron Scattering User Meeting, November 14-15, 2011
ORNL’s neutron scattering facilities, the Spallation Neutron Source and the High Flux Isotope Reactor, are experiencing significant growth with more scientists submitting more proposals to perform more experiments than ever before! Since the last User Meeting, the numbers of instruments, users, experiments, and publications from these resources have greatly increased. The neutron scattering community is invited to attend this meeting to help identify both opportunities for gains in scientific productivity, and the additional capabilities required to accommodate new directions in neutron scattering research. Full details about the meeting can be found at http://neutrons.ornl.gov/conf/onsum2011/.

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-- International Workshop on Uranium Biogeochemistry: Transformations and Applications, March 11-16, 2012
Full details about this workshop, being held in Monte Veritá, Ascona, Switzerland, can be found at http://www.univie.ac.at/uranium_biogeochemistry/home.html.

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-- Upcoming General User Proposal Deadlines
The submission deadline for proposals for the 2012-1 run cycle is October 28, 2011, at 11:59 p.m. CDT. The deadline for 2012-2 run cycle is March 9, 2012. The on-line proposal submission form can be found at http://www.aps.anl.gov/Users/apply_for_beamtime.html.

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-- Save the Date: APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting, May 7-9, 2012

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