APS User News
Issue 65, November 1, 2010

CONTENTS

DIRECTOR'S CORNER

SCIENCE NEWS
1. Science Highlights

USER MATTERS
2. New Badges for APS Users
3. APSUO Goes to Washington!
4. New Biosafety Web Page Available
5. Two New ANL Procedures: Injuries and Illnesses and Incident Notification

FACILITY NEWS
6.Call for Workshop Proposals for APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting
7. Cross-cut Review of APS X-ray Interface and Liquid Surface Scattering Science Held on October 6
8. APS SAC Meets, Sets Review Process for Scientific Priorities in APS-U
9. APS Upgrade on You Tube

BRIEFLY NOTED
-- Second Annual Meeting of the Prairie Section of the American Physical Society, November 18-20, 2010
-- PhD Scholarship on Virus Surrogate in New Zealand

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DIRECTOR’S CORNER

Brian StephensonThis is our first newsletter since I became interim director, and some introductory remarks are in order. Let me begin by saying that I feel greatly honored to lead the Advanced Photon Source while the search for a permanent director is completed. While this is a new role for me and a change for the APS, it's not like I'm a stranger around here. Twenty years ago, when I was with IBM Research, I first got involved in APS through the formation of a CAT to build sector 8. Fifteen years ago, APS was what attracted me to move to the Argonne Materials Science Division. Since those early days, APS has become a fantastic facility for science, the leading x-ray facility in the nation by many measures. Up to now I’ve been involved in building experiments and beamlines for materials and nanoscience research, and I’ve gotten to know and work with many of the APS staff and users over the years. In this new role, I’ll be representing all of APS and its user community, and I’m looking forward to getting to know the rest of you. I am deeply appreciative of this opportunity to work with the broad range of scientists and engineers who are APS users, and I’m constantly amazed by the breadth and depth of the people who work here.

With accelerating advances in x-ray science and the launch of the APS Upgrade project, this is an important and exciting time for the APS and for our community. It will be a pleasure to work as a team with the deputy directors, Denny Mills, Rod Gerig, and Derrick Mancini to coordinate science, operations, and the Upgrade project. My background as a synchrotron scientist fresh from the experimental floor will help keep us grounded in the issues that matter to the users and staff. I’ll be working to increase our partnerships with other scientific groups outside APS -- across Argonne, nationally, and internationally. I also am fully committed to making sure the APS remains one of the safest facilities at Argonne and across the nation. We can count on the support of the Argonne Laboratory Director, Eric Isaacs, who is strongly engaged in providing leadership and advocacy for the APS and for the Upgrade. Eric has told us that he has no higher priority than the continuing excellence of this facility and the success of the people who work here. As we go forward, it is important to make sure we hear from everyone in our community. My door is always open if you have any ideas, questions, or concerns.

Fifteen years ago, I thought Argonne’s APS was the most exciting place to be. Today, I still feel that way. I look forward to tackling this new professional challenge and working with all of you to make APS even better.

(The appointment of G. Brian Stephenson as the Interim Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences was announced September 30, 2010, and became effective October 1. You can read more about the appointment at http://www.aps.anl.gov/News/APS_News/Content/APS_NEWS_20101001.php. User News welcomes Brian and is excited to include his first User News communication in this issue!)

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SCIENCE NEWS

1. Science Highlights

  • Unveiling the Structure of Adenovirus
    After more than a decade of research, Scripps Research Institute scientists using the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory have pieced together the structure of a human adenovirus—the largest complex ever determined at atomic resolution. The new findings about the virus, which causes respiratory, eye, and gastrointestinal infections, may lead to more effective gene therapy and to new anti-viral drugs. The study was published in the journal Science on August 27, 2010. More…
  • At the Crossroads of Chromosomes
    On average, one hundred billion cells in the human body divide over the course of a day. Most of the time the body gets it right but sometimes, problems in cell replication can lead to abnormalities in chromosomes resulting in many types of disorders, from cancer to Down syndrome. Now, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (UPSM) have defined the structure of a key molecule that plays a central role in how DNA is duplicated and then moved correctly and equally into two daughter cells to produce two exact copies of the mother cell. More…
  • Next Step to Drought-Resistant Plants?
    Environmentally friendly sprays that help plants survive drought and other stresses in harsh environments could result from findings based on research carried out at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. The study, which could help combat global food shortages, is a follow-up to findings published by Van Andel Research Institute (VARI) scientists in Nature last year, results that were named among the top breakthroughs of 2009 by Science magazine. More…
  • A Boring Material “Stretched” Could Lead to an Electronics Revolution
    The oxide compound europium titanate is pretty boring on its own. But sliced nanometers thin and chemically stretched on a specially designed template, it takes on properties that could revolutionize the electronics industry, according to research carried out at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. More…

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USER MATTERS

2. New Badges for APS Users
A decision to replace the APS’ aging Cardkey™ access system with a system currently used by other Argonne Divisions requires all APS users to obtain new proximity (or “prox”) photo badges. Rebadging of APS staff and resident users has already taken place; however, until all of the Cardkey™ readers have been replaced, users will need to carry both badges. Currently, non-resident users may obtain new prox badges from the APS User Office. Eventually, user badging will take place at the Argonne Information Center, located just outside the Argonne Main Gate. Transition plans are now being formulated, and a transition schedule will be announced shortly. All new user badges will carry an expiration date. Badges for U.S. citizens will be active for two years from the date of issue. Non-U.S. citizen badges will be active until expiration of status documents or for two years, whichever is sooner. If you have questions, contact Susan Strasser (strasser@aps.anl.gov) in the User Office.

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3. APSUO Goes to Washington!
The National User Facility Organization (NUFO, see http://nufo.org/) participated as an Official Partner of the inaugural USA Science & Engineering Festival, which was held in Washington D.C. October 10-24, 2010. NUFO’s involvement focused on its educational outreach agenda on behalf of user facilities.

Hundreds of the country's leading science and engineering organizations participated in the country's first national science festival with the goal of sparking the interest of America’s young students in the sciences. The festival week (http://www.usasciencefestival.org/) included day, evening, and weekend events for the general public, including workshops, lectures, open houses, performances and more. President Obama hosted a White House Science Fair on October 18 to recognize the winners of a broad range of science, technology, engineering and math competitions (http://www.whitehouse.gov/the-press-office/2010/10/15/president-obama-host-white-house-science-fair). The festival’s free grand finale two-day expo on the National Mall offered people of all ages a chance to explore hundreds of fun hands-on activities covering a wide variety of science and engineering topics (http://www.usasciencefestival.org/2010festival/expo).

Dennis Brown (Northern Illinois University), representing the APS Users Organization (APSUO), participated in the festival by staffing the booth sponsored by NUFO. The NUFO booth (one of at least 400, including one from Argonne National Laboratory) focused on showcasing the forefront science being conducted at U.S. national user facilities. Dr. Brown described the event and his experience as follows:

“The NUFO demonstrations attracted a lot of attention. One was using NiTinol wires to demonstrate the ability of shape memory alloys (bend the wire, then heat it up and watch it return to its original shape). Another was a demonstration of nanoparticle-coated cloth, which became rainproof when the coating was applied.

“We also had an astronomy quizboard on comets, and we had posters detailing the science done at many of our national user facilities. The students (and their parents) really enjoyed the demonstrations. All of the NUFO brochures were snatched up the first day, so a lot of parents got to learn about NUFO, the federal research labs, and the research that is being carried out at our facilities. We had a continuous stream of visitors (nonstop) from 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. when we shut down. We were so busy that we actually forgot to take a break to get something to eat!

“The size of the festival was enormous. The map I was given only showed the festival covering mainly one city block on Pennsylvania Ave., so I was expecting just a small affair. However, to my surprise, there were also events held at Wilson Plaza, The National Museum of Natural History, as well as the booths that covered half the National Mall (the mall that goes from the Washington Monument to the U.S. Capitol). There were (roughly) a staggering 400 organizations fielding about 440 booths in total! When I walked out onto the National Mall, I was so astonished that I did not know what to do--it was just not possible to visit every booth in one (or even two) days! There must have been more than 100,000 people milling about. Every science and engineering organization was out there including Argonne National Laboratory, Lockheed Martin, NASA, Intel, MIT, NSF, NOVA, Duke University, and many other universities and science organizations. All were performing demonstrations ranging from placing paper airplanes made by students into wind tunnels, to displaying large chunks of glaciers brought from Alaska for people to touch, to a show by Bill Nye (The Science Guy), to robotics and solar cells, to students playing with soldering irons and circuit boards to make unstable oscillator circuits.

“It was a breathtaking festival, and I hope it will be the first of many such events!”

Argonne’s Division of Educational Programs also staffed a booth. They had the “Energy Bike,” which was equipped with a generator and a panel of both standard incandescent bulbs, CFLs and LEDs. Pedaling the bike with either bank of bulbs connected to the generator provided first hand a graphic (and tiring) demonstration of how much less energy CFLs (and particularly LEDs) require. They also tried to power a hair drier from the bike, a daunting task. A quantitative measure of the power delivered to the bulbs could be calculated from voltage and amp meters. A large poster provided information about how the electricity is generated. There was a line to ride the bike from 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday. Over 350 children and adults rode the bike during this festival.

For further information on the festival, go to http://www.usasciencefestival.org/. For additional NUFO news and more festival photos, go to http://www.nufo.org/.

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4. New Biosafety Web Page Available
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is strongly committed to keeping researchers and visiting scientific users safe. The Institutional Biosafety Committee at Argonne plans and implements the biosafety program and now provides non-ANL researchers access to required information and applications to perform biohazardous research at ANL.

Argonne requires that research conducted by personnel and visiting users at Argonne is in compliance with the following:

  • NIH Guidelines for Research Involving Recombinant DNA Molecules
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Biosafety Publications
  • 42 CFR Part 73: Select Agents and Toxins

A new biosafety web page that provides links to these and many other relevant documents has been created at http://www.anl.gov/Science_and_Technology/Biosafety/.

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5. Two New ANL Procedures: “Injuries and Illnesses” and “Incident Notification”
Two new Argonne Laboratory-wide procedures went into effect on October 4, 2010: Injuries and Illnesses (LMS-PROC-86) and Incident Notification (LMS-PROC-157). These procedures are available at https://docs.anl.gov/lms/index.html.

Reporting Incidents and Injuries
In an emergency, call for assistance as follows:
Argonne landline, call 911 or cell phone, call 630-252-1911, and then notify your supervisor.

If the incident is not an emergency, including minor injuries such as small cuts, scrapes, or abrasions, or after an off-site emergency occurs and is stabilized, report incident as follows: If computer access is readily available, complete and submit the Argonne incident notification web form (https://webapps.anl.gov/incident/) within one hour after the incident is stabilized and notify your supervisor.

If computer access is not readily available, call the incident reporting hotline at 811 or 630-252-1811 from a cell phone or outside line to report the incident within one hour after the incident is stabilized and then notify your supervisor.

Injury Self-Treatment
Self-treatment may be appropriate for small cuts, scrapes, or abrasions. Self-treatment is prohibited in biological, chemical, and radiological material handling areas.

The following items are approved for self-treatment:

  • Latex-free adhesive bandages
  • Latex-free knuckle bandages
  • Single-use packages of antiseptic/alcohol wipes
  • Single-use packages of Polysporin® antibiotic ointment
  • Single-use ice packs

Medical department must approve all additional items. Report injuries using the above guidance.

When there is uncertainty about the seriousness of the situation, call the Medical Division at 630-252-2800 and follow instructions given. (Contact: Tom Barkalow, PSC ESH/QA Coordinator, barkalow@aps.anl.gov.)

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FACILITY NEWS

6. Call for Workshop Proposals for APS/CNM/EMC Users Meeting
Planning for the 2011 Users Meeting, scheduled for May 2-4, 2011, has now begun. This combined event (Advanced Photon Source, Center for Nanoscale Materials, and the Electron Microscopy Center) will have a slightly different format than previous meetings, with a beginning plenary session on Monday, followed by several parallel sessions and an evening social event. Tuesday will consist of three fully integrated all-day workshops, each co-chaired by a representative from each of the three facilities, with a poster session immediately following. Wednesday, May 4 will feature facility-specific plenary sessions and workshops.

The APS Users Organization (APSUO) Steering Committee is now calling for suggestions for APS session focus speakers and proposals for APS-specific workshops. These proposals should be no more than one page long and include
a description of the workshop's scientific or technical focus, a list of suggested speakers (it need not be a final list), and
the names of at least two workshop organizers.

Limited funds will be available to help cover costs associated with workshop organization, but identification of other support would be useful. The workshop schedule will be announced after the APSUO Steering Committee meeting on January 21, 2011.

Please send focus speaker suggestions to Peter Eng (eng@cars.uchicago.edu) and workshop proposals to Pamela Focia (focia@northwestern.edu) no later than January 7, 2011.

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7. Cross-cut Review of APS X-ray Interface and Liquid Surface Scattering Science Held on October 6
X-ray interface and liquid surface scattering science at the APS were under close scrutiny on October 6 by a review committee chaired by APS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) member Friso van der Veen and including several other SAC members and external reviewers. This review was one of an on-going series that examine specific areas of science across the entire facility rather than focusing on one particular beamline or sector. Although the review report has not yet been received by the APS, preliminary comments indicate that committee members were impressed with the quality of science presented by the invited speakers as well as the science quality of the almost 100 contributed posters (and the enthusiasm of the poster presenters). Also discussed were the potential for expanding resources for this science area in the APS Upgrade and the need for any new facilities to include instrumentation to capitalize on the cutting-edge capabilities that will become available.

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8. APS SAC Meets, Sets Review Process for Scientific Priorities in APS-U
At its meeting on October 7-8, 2010, the APS Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC) heard updates from APS management on progress toward the development of a Conceptual Design Report, one of the DOE requirements for obtaining CD-1 (Critical Decision 1), which is approval of the preliminary baseline scope. To assist the APS in prioritizing the proposed new beamlines/major beamline upgrades (one of the many requirements for CD-1), the SAC developed a scientific review process. Briefly, each proposed beamline/major beamline upgrade team is being asked to submit a 10-15 page scientific proposal for review by one of five review panels, each chaired by a SAC member and containing additional SAC members, as well as external scientific reviewers. These panels will meet at the APS on March 7-8, 2011, hear brief presentations from each team leader, and then score the proposals according to previously developed review criteria. Following the panel meeting, the full SAC will meet on March 9 to develop recommended priorities. This process will enable the APS to make sound scientific decisions on the proposed scope of work to be included in the APS Upgrade project. Although the SAC recommendations will provide a draft priority order for beamline construction, changes can continue to be made for the next couple of years as additional information is obtained and cost estimates are refined.

(Photo from left to right: Front Row: Ka Yee Lee, William Stirling; Row Two: Soichi Wakatsuki, Janos Kirz, and Louise Johnson; Third Row: Glenn Waychunas, Britt Hedman, Dan Neumann, and John Corlett; Fourth Row: Howard Einspahr, Miles Klein, Brian Stephenson, and David Tiede; Last Row: Roger Leach, Philip Bucksbaum, and J. Friso van der Veen)

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9. APS Upgrade on You Tube
The next in the series of the You Tube APS Upgrade videos is “Advanced Photon Source Upgrade Project - Health and Life Sciences.” Here is the link to this video, the second in the series: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onkAH_Ri1eI.

The APS Upgrade videos are all available on the Argonne National Laboratory You Tube site.

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BRIEFLY NOTED

--Second Annual Meeting of the Prairie Section of the American Physical Society, November 18-20, 2010
The Second Annual Meeting of the Prairie Section of the APS (PSAPS) will be held November 18-20, 2010, on the main campus of the Illinois Institute of Technology. Conference highlights include invited talks by:

  • Dr. Eric Landahl, DePaul University
  • Dr. Derrick Mancini, Argonne National Laboratory
  • Dr. Wesley Smith, University of Wisconsin, Madison
  • Dr. Joseph Lyding, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
  • Dr. Zack Sullivan, Illinois Institute of Technology
  • Dr. Thomas Erber, Illinois Institute of Technology

Highlighted events include a special public lecture on Thursday evening November 18 by Dr. Chris Quigg of Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, a luncheon with Nobel Laureate Leon Lederman (for students only), invited speakers for each parallel session, a poster session, and a Friday evening conference banquet. The Chicago Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers will be holding their meeting in conjunction with the PSAPS, including workshops and invited presentations covering physics education at both the high school and collegiate levels.

The conference will be student friendly and we strongly encourage student participation (both graduate and undergraduate). For additional information, please visit the conference website at http://ia64.phys.iit.edu/OCS/index.php/PSAPS-CSAAPT/2010 (Contact: Carlo Segre, segre@iit.edu)

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-- PhD Scholarship on Virus Surrogate in New Zealand
A highly motivated and competent PhD student is sought to join an interdisciplinary team working on a three-year project under a Marsden Fund awarded from the New Zealand Royal Society to develop and validate a virus surrogate for groundwater transport studies. The project will span areas of nanotechnology, biochemistry, molecular biology, virology, and contaminant hydrology. The candidate should have a background in biochemistry and molecular biology. Skills and knowledge of surface chemistry and quantitative polymerase chain reaction are particularly important. He/she will be registered at School of Biological Sciences, University of Canterbury, and hosted by Institute of Environmental Science & Research in Christchurch, New Zealand. Please send a letter of motivation, CV, a copy of academic records and contact details of three referees to Dr. Liping Pang (see contact information below) before November 30, 2010. Applications without academic records will not be considered. The expected start date is January 2011.

Dr. Liping Pang
Senior Groundwater Scientist
Institute of Environmental Science & Research
27 Creyke Rd, Ilam (PO Box 29-181)
Christchurch, New Zealand
Phone: 64-3-3510029 (dir.)
Fax: 64-3-3510010
E-mail: liping.pang@esr.cri.nz
http://www.esr.cri.nz

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